Courses

21 - 40 of 105 courses found when searching for ""

Internship-Vis Arts/Graphics

ART 293

Students will be engaged in practical work experience within the areas of Visual Arts or Graphic Design. The parameters of the internship will be established between the student and the hosting organization under the department's supervision. A contract specifying hours and a method of evaluation will be signed by the parties with sufficient hours for the credits earned. This opportunity will be open to second-year students with the approval of the student's academic advisor and the department chairperson. Phone 687-5192 for further information.

Solar System Astronomy

AST 102

Designed for the non-science major, this course will provide an introduction to the astronomy of our solar system-from its earliest beginnings as humans pondered the movement of wandering "stars" in the night sky to the most recent data returned by NASA space probes. Topics covered will include the origin and evolution of the solar system, the Sun and solar wind, planets, moons, asteroids, meteors, comets, and Kuiper belt objects. Additional topics will include the search for life in the solar system and the search for extrasolar planets. Students may attend a night telescope observation on campus. 3 hrs. lect. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

Fund Concepts of Biology

BIO 100

Designed for students who plan to study biology, nursing, or veterinary technology courses. This non-laboratory course covers topics from the basic principles of life through the cell concept. The course strengthens the student's in biology. Topics covered include cell reproduction, cell respiration, and classification. Students may not use this course to satisfy a science requirement or science elective.

Biology I-Non-Science Majors

BIO 101

Designed for the non-science major, this nonlaboratory course covers basic concepts such as the cell, principles of inheritance, and the species. Students study cell structure and function, DNA, cell division, and the kingdoms.

General Biology I

BIO 105

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence of BIO 105 and BIO 106. Topics of this lecture and laboratory course include the scientific method, evolution, basic chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism and enzymes, cellular respiration and photosynthesis, cell division, and genetics. The laboratory component includes microscope work, examination of preserved and living specimens, and performing experiments with emphasis on the scientific method. 3 hrs. lect; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

General Biology II

BIO 106

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence of BIO 105 and BIO 106. Topics of this lecture and laboratory course include a survey of the diversity of life: taxonomy and phylogeny of the prokaryotes, protists, fungi, green plants, and animals; an introduction to ecology; and a comparative survey of form and function in plants and animals. The laboratory component includes microscope work, examination of preserved and living specimens, and performing experiments with emphasis on the scientific method. It is recommended, but not required, that BIO 105 be taken before BIO 106. 3 hrs. lect; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

Human Anat & Physiology I

BIO 107

The normal structure and function of the human organism, beginning with basic biological principles and progressing through selected organ systems, are the focus of this course. Laboratory work emphasizes hands-on experiences using the microscope, models, and specimens. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

Human Anat & Physiology II

BIO 108

A continuation of BIO 107, this course covers the normal structure and function of selected organ systems. Laboratory work emphasizes human anatomy utilizing models, specimens, and cat dissections. Students enrolling in BIO 108 who are pregnant or breast-feeding should consult their advisors. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: BIO 107. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

Human Biology

BIO 109

This is a non-laboratory biology course designed for the non-science major who has an interest in learning about the human body. Students will study the basic anatomy and physiology of major body systems and some common diseases associated with those systems. Special emphasis will be placed on topics of modern concern such as new diseases and new techniques for treating the human body. Students will be encouraged to learn to use information in this class for making informed personal and societal decisions.

Medical Terminology

BIO 111

This course presents a study of basic medical terminology. The primary purpose is for students to be able to analyze a word and determine its meaning and proper usage. The correct spelling of terms is also emphasized.

Microbiology

BIO 201

The study of microorganisms both beneficial and harmful to humans is covered in this course. Students learn taxonomy, structure, physiology, reproduction, ecology, and control of microbes. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: One year of laboratory biology courses.

Genetics

BIO 206

Aspects of classical and modern genetics are presented in this course. Discussion starts with the structure and function of DNA and moves through the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels of inheritance. In the laboratory, microbial, plant, and animal genetics are investigated using modern techniques of DNA analysis as well as real and virtual techniques of classical genetics. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: BIO 105 and BIO 106 or BIO 107 and BIO 108.

Math for Bus & Industry

BUS 102

Students apply basic mathematics to situations encountered in business and industry. Emphasis is placed on solving word problems from a variety of topical areas including resource management, wholesale and retail pricing, payroll and accounting-related tasks, and simple and compound interest related applications.

Business Communications

BUS 104

This is a survey of written and oral business communication. It emphasizes techniques for effective communication, experience in creating typical business correspondence, and critical analysis of communications.

Entrepreneurship

BUS 115

Students are introduced to the basics required for starting and operating a small business. Subjects include marketing, financing, legal structures, franchising, and managing employees. Students will apply terminology and concepts in developing a draft business plan.

Business Economics

BUS 150

An introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of economics as they relate to the business environment, this course offers such topics as the economic system, the market mechanism and competition, money, credit, banking, and other relevant economic activities and policies that relate to business. The course is open to students who are pursuing the A.A.S. degree in business and should not be taken by the student who needs to transfer economics courses to a four-year college.

Principles of Management

BUS 161

The basics of operational theory and the science of management are presented. Concepts center on an analysis of the four major functions of management: planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. The course emphasizes the integration of management principles with other business procedures and examines management interactions with external environments influencing business.

Computer Appli In Bus

BUS 171

Using the Microsoft Office suite of business applications for the PC, students learn how computers can aid the business decision-making process. The course introduces appropriate terminology and concepts using hands-on training. Applications include word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. The course only supports the use of Windows based Microsoft Office. Lab fee.

Legal Environment of Business

BUS 180

Students study the fundamental concepts, principles and rules of law and equity that apply to business activities. Legal theory is applied to commercial transactions. Topics covered include an introduction to the law and the legal system, the Uniform Commercial Code, contracts, sale of good, negotiable instruments, product liability, negligence, agency, bailment, torts, and employment law. This course is required for students in the Business and Entrepreneurship and Business: Accounting A.A.S. degree programs. It is not recommended for students enrolled in the transfer-oriented A.S. in Business Administration program.

Business Law I

BUS 201

This course provides an analysis of business transactions in the legal environment. Topics include an introduction to the history of modern commercial law, the courts, and the legal processes; detailed examination of the principles of the laws of contracts, including contracts for the international sale of goods (CISG); and consideration of related topics including product liability and business torts. Pre-requisite: ENG 101.


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