Courses

81 - 100 of 253 courses found when searching for ""

Criminal Justice Internship

CRJ 255

Under the supervision of criminal justice officials, students participate in agency activities by performing a variety of support services and administrative tasks. Students have an opportunity to contrast criminal justice theory with the reality of the workplace. Appointment to, and continuation in, any internship is contingent upon meeting specific eligibility requirements and the standards of the sponsoring criminal justice agency. In addition, students attend a one-hour lecture each week. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 30 credits with a 2.5 grade-point average and/or by advisement. Phone 687-5192 for further information.

Critical Reading and Thinking

CRT 101

This is a four credit course designed to provide students with essential study, reading and writing skills to enhance their academic college experiences. Students will receive instruction and practice in a wide variety of study, test/note taking, reading, and writing strategies. An emphasis will be placed on critical reading with a focus on higher-level comprehension and vocabulary skills needed in a variety of academic disciplines. An additional lab component will augment the course and provide individualized practice in specific skills.

Web Application Development II

CSC 132

This course covers advanced web application development frameworks, languages and techniques such as Ruby on Rails, jQuery, AngularJS, PHP,and Node.js or equivalent. Students work in teams to develop real-world web application projects. Topics include an overview of the Model-View-Controller (MVC) software architectural pattern and database fundamentals using MySQL or equivalent. Prerequisite: CSC 131 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the instructor.

Computer Science II

CSC 180

This course covers the fundamentals of algorithms and object oriented software development. Topics include: modern IDE for software development, primitive and reference data types, encapsulation, information hiding, selection, iteration, functions/methods, parameters, recursion, exception handling, generic linear data structures (arrays,records/structs) and maps, file types, file I/O, simple GUIs with event handling, programming to an interface, lambda expressions, semantics of inheritance and use of polymorphism, relation with subtyping, search (sequential, binary), select (min, max), and sort (bubble, insertion, selection) algorithms, complexity notation, documentation using standard tools, program testing (unit testing) and debugging, reasoning about control flow in a program, and societal impacts related to computing and software. Prerequisite: CSC 150 with a C- or better or permission of the instructor.

SoftwareEngineering Practices

CSC 205

Students learn about object-oriented design and documentation methodologies to solve real-world problems while working in teams. Topics include requirements analysis, specifications, design, and testing with a focus on agile development methodologies. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) will be covered. Students will work on team projects to develop a real world software application while applying the software engineering principles covered in the course. Prerrequisite: CSC 180 or permission of the instructor.

Apple iOS App Development

CSC 215

This course prepares the student to be a mobile application developer for Apple iOS devices such as the iPhone and iPad using Swift, a new programming language from Apple. Concepts and techniques introduced in this course include: · Introduction to the Apple Xcode application environment · The Swift Programming Language · Differences between iPhone and iPad Development · Animation and simple game development · Apple guidelines for publishing apps on the Apple App Store. Corerequisite: CSC 180 or permission of the instructor.

Computer Game Design I

CSC 220

This course is an introduction to the principles of computer game development. As such, it draws on the student's background in math and physics and enables a creative expression in addition to building on computer science concepts of object oriented programming. It covers the main concepts, principles, and techniques for designing playable computer games. Students will study and learn to utilize a variety of technologies relevant to games including tools and frameworks for game development; languages to manipulate game elements, 3 dimensional modeling, the physical principles of game object behavior, principles of scene lighting and sound effects. Computer simulation is the fundamental technology underlying all of thesre principles. Basic game theory and concepts will be studied and used in the projects developed during the course. Corequisite: CSC 180 or permission of the instructor.

Comp Architecture & Organ

CSC 250

This course covers fundamentals of computer architecture and organization. Topics include: classical von Neumann machine, major functional units, primary memory, representation of numerical (integer and floating point) and non-numerical data, CPU architecture, instruction encoding, fetch-decode-execute cycle, instruction formats, addressing modes, symbolic assembler, assembly language programming, handling of subprogram calls at assembly level, mapping between high level language patterns and assembly/machine language, interrupts and I/O operations, virtual memory management, and data access from a magnetic disk. Prerequisite: CSC 180 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the instructor.

Special Topics in Computer Sci

CSC 270

This course explores special topics in the field of computing through a more concentrated study in a current applied or theoretical area of the field. Each course emphasizes a basic understanding of the topics' content, and an introduction to its underlying mathematical and other foundations. The course explores topics of interest outside of the scope of current computing courses and requires a significant project and/or research paper in the subject area as a major component of the final grade. Prerequisite:CSC 150 or permission of the instructor or coordinator.

Intro to Macroeconomics

ECO 101

Students are introduced to national income analysis. Topics include money, banking and monetary policy, national income determination and fiscal policy, macroeconomic policy, the problems of inflation and unemployment, and economic growth. Prerequisite: MAT 100 or high school Mathematics Course II or by advisement.

Intro to Microeconomics

ECO 102

The laws of markets are surveyed in this course. Topics include the law of supply and demand, the economics of the firm, competition, monopoly, and economic regulation. Prerequisite: MAT 100 or high school Mathematics Course II or by advisement.

Appl Child Developmt-Ed Majors

EDU 200

Students apply concepts and theories of child development while participating in a 20-hour field experience in a Kindergarten-Grade 6 classroom. This course must be taken concurrently with a PSY 200 Psychology of Child Development section reserved for Education majors. Prerequisite: Students should have a minimum cumulative average of 2.00, recommendations of two SUNY Ulster instructors, and required fingerprinting. Contact the Education Program Coordinator for fingerprint information.

Intro Elem School/Teaching

EDU 201

Students are provided with a survey of early childhood and elementary education and given an opportunity to explore possible careers in education. A field experience in a culturally diverse Kindergarten-Grade 6 classroom is included. 2 hrs. lect.; 2 hrs. lab. Prerequisites: Overall minimum cumulative average of 2.00, PSY 200 with a grade of C or better, recommendations from two SUNY Ulster instructors, and required fingerprinting. Permission of the instructor is required.

Soc & Phil Fdn of Education

EDU 203

This course will provide students with a greater understanding of the social and philosophical issues involved in education and an understanding of the historical development of the public education system in the United States.

Appl Adolescent Develop-Ed Maj

EDU 206

Students apply concepts and theories of adolescent development while participating in a 20-hour field experience in grades 7-8 in a middle school setting. This course must be taken concurrently with PSY 206 Psychology of Adolescence. Prerequisite: Students should have a minimum cumulative average of 2.00, recommendations of two SUNY Ulster instructors, and required fingerprinting. Contact the Education Program Coordinator for fingerprint information.

College English I

ENG 101

Students read, discuss, and write essays that explore contemporary social issues. Students work on skills necessary to meet the challenge of writing accurately and clearly on the college level. Students write a minimum of eight essays, including three in-class essays. Emphasis is on the development of a topic, use of appropriate rhetoric and research, and a review of grammar. At the end of the semester, students must take a writing competency test, which is evaluated by a panel of instructors and constitutes 25% of students' final grade for the course. Prerequisite: Placement by test or completion of ENG 081 with a grade of C or better. A grade of C or better must be earned for advancement to ENG 102.

College English II

ENG 102

Students read and discuss literature that explores the human condition and its moral dilemmas, social problems, and values. This course continues to stress the development of writing skills, with emphasis on criticism, analysis, research methods, and documentation. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 101 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite or corequisite: LIB 111.

Honors English II

ENG 172

Students study authors and works from the Medieval era through the 17th century. Extensive writing, with emphasis on the use of secondary materials and a research paper, is required. The course fulfills the ENG 102 College English II requirement. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 171 or the permission of the Honors Program Director.Prerequisite or corequisite: LIB 111.

American Literature I

ENG 203

Students are provided with a historical survey of American literature from the early colonial period through the mid-19th century. Representative authors include Winthrop, Bradstreet, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. Prerequisites: ENG 102 with a grade of C or better and LIB 111 or by permission of instructor.

Practical Grammar

ENG 209

Designed to provide a working knowledge of standard English grammar for future teachers and all others interested in the structure of the English language, this course not only covers basic grammatical principles, but also models student-centered methods of instruction. Topics covered include parts of speech, sentence patterns, phrases and clauses, diagramming sentences, and practical applications. This class does not fulfill a humanities elective. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or better or permission of the instructor.


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