Courses

61 - 80 of 234 courses found when searching for ""

Art of the Film

COM 209

The esthetics of the film is presented in this course. In order to provide students with an enriched experience in film watching, emphasis is on techniques used by a director. Students view and discuss selected films. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101.

Introduction to Journalism

COM 210

This course introduces students to the process and techniques of journalism with a hands-on approach that will focus on the writing and editing of a variety of news stories and short features. While the emphasis will be an application to print media, photojournalism as well as internet and broadcast journalism will be explored. Members of the class act as the staff of the campus online newspaper and are expected to contribute articles to it as part of their course requirements. NOTE: An average of an additional 30 hours outside of class time is required to cover events, conduct interviews and get source material for stories. Prerequisites: COM 111 and ENG 102.

World Cinema

COM 219

This course is designed to explore the contributions to cinema arts by filmmakers outside the United States, exploring both the history and the diversity of expression found in world cinema. Films from Europe, Asia, and Africa will illustrate a variety of techniques and subject matter with examples from various historical periods and genres. Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Videography and Editing

COM 227

In this course single camera digital videography and non-linear editing will be taught through a series of exercises resulting in a series of short films exploring both documentary and fiction genres. Prerequisite: COM 127 or permission of instructor, COM 131 recommended.

Criminal Justice System

CRJ 101

Structures and processes in the administration of criminal justice are explored in this course, which provides an analysis of the operation of the criminal process as a system from arrest through conviction and treatment.

Terrorism & Homeland Security

CRJ 211

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of terrorism and issues pertaining to homeland security. It is designed to serve as a practical examination for people who will or may face the threat of terrorism and expose them in a vast array of issues, theories, and opinions. Students currently serving in, or planning on entering law enforcement, military, intelligence, or private protective professions will especially benefit from this foundational course. Prerequisite: ENG 101, CRJ 101

Policing in America

CRJ 214

This course is designed to familiarize students with the history, organization, responsibilities, and challenges of policing in the United States. Policing is explored from multiple perspectives including: An examination of police officer-citizen interaction, the critical relationship between the community and its protectors policing in a free and democratic society, and system relationships with other justice and human service organizations. This course will focus on the examination of issues and strategies that will serve to bridge the gap between the community and the police.

Constit/Criminal Procedures

CRJ 215

An exploration of the constitutional dimensions and limitations on the behavior of participants in the criminal justice system is provided in this course. Students study cases involving the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, and 14th Amendments.

Sci,Legal Aspects,Invest

CRJ 218

Students examine the scientific and legal principles and procedures for locating, gathering, examining, preserving, and presenting forensic evidence at various phases of the criminal process.

Understanding Crime/Crim Behav

CRJ 230

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the scientific study of criminal situations and criminal behavior. The course will cover the importance of measuring crime and review major sources that collect crime information. It will also examine the major criminological theories from biology, economics, psychology, and sociology and focus especially on neo-classical approaches that seek to manipulate environments to reduce and/or prevent criminal behavior. The course will explore historical, political, and empirical trends leading to theory development. Prerequisites: ENG 101, SOC 101, and either CRJ 101, or HUS 103

Contemp Issues-Crim Justice

CRJ 231

This is an overview of some of the current issues, problems, and concerns within the three branches of the criminal justice system. Selected topics may include terrorism, corruption, plea bargaining, organized crime, new modes of treatment in the correctional setting, and sources of violence.

Ethics in Criminal Justice

CRJ 233

This course introduces the fundamentals of ethical theory with an area-specific examination of ethical dilemmas pertaining to the professions of the criminal justice system. Students will focus on comprehensive issues facing law enforcement, legal practice, sentencing, corrections, research, and crime control policy. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101

Juvenile Justice System

CRJ 235

This course presents an examination of prevailing juvenile justice philosophy, existing juvenile justice laws, public policy, and current research and theories, as well as methods of treatment, control, and prevention.

Criminal Justice Internship

CRJ 255

Under the supervision of criminal justice officials, students participate in agency activities by performing a variety of support services and administrative tasks. Students have an opportunity to contrast criminal justice theory with the reality of the workplace. Appointment to, and continuation in, any internship is contingent upon meeting specific eligibility requirements and the standards of the sponsoring criminal justice agency. In addition, students attend a one-hour lecture each week. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 30 credits with a 2.5 grade-point average and/or by advisement. Phone 687-5192 for further information.

Critical Reading and Thinking

CRT 101

This is a four credit course designed to provide students with essential study, reading and writing skills to enhance their academic college experiences. Students will receive instruction and practice in a wide variety of study, test/note taking, reading, and writing strategies. An emphasis will be placed on critical reading with a focus on higher-level comprehension and vocabulary skills needed in a variety of academic disciplines. An additional lab component will augment the course and provide individualized practice in specific skills.

Web Application Development II

CSC 132

This course covers advanced web application development frameworks, languages and techniques such as Ruby on Rails, jQuery, AngularJS, PHP,and Node.js or equivalent. Students work in teams to develop real-world web application projects. Topics include an overview of the Model-View-Controller (MVC) software architectural pattern and database fundamentals using MySQL or equivalent. Prerequisite: CSC 131 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the instructor.

Computer Science II

CSC 180

This course covers the fundamentals of algorithms and object oriented software development. Topics include: modern IDE for software development, primitive and reference data types, encapsulation, information hiding, selection, iteration, functions/methods, parameters, recursion, exception handling, generic linear data structures (arrays,records/structs) and maps, file types, file I/O, simple GUIs with event handling, programming to an interface, lambda expressions, semantics of inheritance and use of polymorphism, relation with subtyping, search (sequential, binary), select (min, max), and sort (bubble, insertion, selection) algorithms, complexity notation, documentation using standard tools, program testing (unit testing) and debugging, reasoning about control flow in a program, and societal impacts related to computing and software. Prerequisite: CSC 150 with a C- or better or permission of the instructor.

SoftwareEngineering Practices

CSC 205

Students learn about object-oriented design and documentation methodologies to solve real-world problems while working in teams. Topics include requirements analysis, specifications, design, and testing with a focus on agile development methodologies. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) will be covered. Students will work on team projects to develop a real world software application while applying the software engineering principles covered in the course. Prerrequisite: CSC 180 or permission of the instructor.

Apple iOS App Development

CSC 215

This course prepares the student to be a mobile application developer for Apple iOS devices such as the iPhone and iPad using Swift, a new programming language from Apple. Concepts and techniques introduced in this course include: · Introduction to the Apple Xcode application environment · The Swift Programming Language · Differences between iPhone and iPad Development · Animation and simple game development · Apple guidelines for publishing apps on the Apple App Store. Corerequisite: CSC 180 or permission of the instructor.

Computer Game Design I

CSC 220

This course is an introduction to the principles of computer game development. As such, it draws on the student's background in math and physics and enables a creative expression in addition to building on computer science concepts of object oriented programming. It covers the main concepts, principles, and techniques for designing playable computer games. Students will study and learn to utilize a variety of technologies relevant to games including tools and frameworks for game development; languages to manipulate game elements, 3 dimensional modeling, the physical principles of game object behavior, principles of scene lighting and sound effects. Computer simulation is the fundamental technology underlying all of thesre principles. Basic game theory and concepts will be studied and used in the projects developed during the course. Corequisite: CSC 180 or permission of the instructor.


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