Courses

101 - 120 of 250 courses found when searching for ""

College English I

ENG 101

Students read, discuss, and write essays that explore contemporary social issues. Students work on skills necessary to meet the challenge of writing accurately and clearly on the college level. Students write a minimum of eight essays, including three in-class essays. Emphasis is on the development of a topic, use of appropriate rhetoric and research, and a review of grammar. At the end of the semester, students must take a writing competency test, which is evaluated by a panel of instructors and constitutes 25% of students' final grade for the course. Prerequisite: Placement by test or completion of ENG 081 with a grade of C or better. A grade of C or better must be earned for advancement to ENG 102.

College English II

ENG 102

Students read and discuss literature that explores the human condition and its moral dilemmas, social problems, and values. This course continues to stress the development of writing skills, with emphasis on criticism, analysis, research methods, and documentation. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 101 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite or corequisite: LIB 111.

Honors English I

ENG 171

Students study authors and works ranging from the Classical era to early Medieval times. Extensive writing, with emphasis on analysis and other rhetorical forms, is a major component of the course. The course fulfills the ENG 101 College English I requirement. Pre and/or Corequisite: The permission of the Honors Program Director.

American Literature II

ENG 204

Students are provided with a historical survey of American literature from the late 19th century to the present. Representative authors include Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Chopin, Frost, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and Hughes. Prerequisites: ENG 102 with a grade of C or better and LIB 111 or by permission of instructor.

Shakespeare

ENG 215

Students study and discuss a selection of Shakespeare's major works, principally the great comedies, tragedies, and histories. Prerequisites: ENG 102 with a grade of C or better and LIB 111 or by permission of instructor.

Classics of Children's Lit

ENG 218

This course has been designed with Early Education English majors (1-6) in mind, but it is also open to all English Education majors and as an elective to students outside the discipline. The primary focus of the course is to critically examine selected titles from the Newbery Medal and Honor Book list. In addition to the Newbery titles, special consideration will be given to classics of children's literature from the Victorian period to the modern period. Class discussions will focus on the social and literary implications of children's literature, literary technique and content, and the role of fantasy in children's literature. Prerequisites: ENG 102 with a grade of C or better and LIB 111 or by permission of instructor.

Technical Writing

ENG 227

An introduction to technical writing, this course considers the problems of presenting technical subject matter and provides instruction and practice in report writing and oral presentations. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a C or better or A.A.S. program requirement or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite or corequisite: LIB 111.

Independent Study in English

ENG 280

The student will have the opportunity to do independent research and study in the area of English. The work will be done with the guidance of an instructor from the Department of English and Philosophy with written approval of the Department Chairperson. Open only for sophomores for not more than two semesters.

Intro Enr Des: 3D Prototyping

ENR 103

Students are introduced to engineering design through a series of projects involving 3D modeling and 3D printing. While students will learn some CAD specific skills, the emphasis of the course is on the design process: define the problem, propose multiple solutions, develop the solutions, realize a prototype, test, and refine the design. Clear communication of specifications and solutions will be emphasized. This course is targeting engineering majors but is also designed for other majors who would like to work on interdisciplinary projects.

Intro Enr Design:Elem Robotics

ENR 105

Students are introduced to engineering design through a series of projects involving robotics and introductory microprocessor coding. While students will learn some programming specific skills, the emphasis of the course is on the design process: define the problem, propose multiple solutions, develop the solutions, realize a prototype, test, and refine the design. Clear communication of specifications and solutions will b emphasized. This course is targeting engineering majors but is designed for other majors who would like to work on interdisciplinary projects. Prerequisite: MAT 115.

Intro to Circuit Analysis

ENR 208

Topics in this course include element and interconnection laws, network theorems, circuit equations and methods of solution (branch equations, Kirchoff's Law, node and mesh equations, and Norton and Thevenin equivalents), transient and steady state responses, frequency response, resonance phenomena, and power. Basic solid-state electronic circuits are introduced (two-port and three-port elements). 3 hrs. lect. This course includes a 1 hr. lab (ENR 218) which is required for computer engineering and electrical engineering majors and optional for all others. Corequisites: PHY 110 and MAT 180 or by advisement.

Engineer Mechanics:Statics

ENR 215

Both the classical and vector approaches in the application of physics to practical engineering analysis are featured in this course. Students learn the principles of static equilibrium of rigid bodies. Topics include force systems, couples, first- and second-moments, centroids, friction, and free body diagrams. Application areas include trusses, frames, machines, cables, and other structures. 3 hrs. lect. Prerequisites: PHY 109 and MAT 180.

Strength of Materials

ENR 217

Students learn the application of physics (statics) and materials science theory to the analysis and design of structural members. The principles of axial, shear, and torsional stresses, shear flow, bending stress, and combined stresses are covered. Shear and bending moment characteristics are related to the flexural formula, including such tools as the moment-area method and the three-moment theorem. Design of pressure vessels, columns, and other systems is emphasized. 3 hrs. lect. Prerequisite: MAT 180. Corequisite: ENR 215.

Intro Circuit Analys Lab

ENR 218

This is a one-semester hour laboratory in support of ENR 208. The laboratory is required for computer engineering and electrical engineering majors and optional for all other students.

Earth's Atmosphere & Oceans

ESC 101

Designed for the non-science major, this course provides an introduction to Earth Science through an examination of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Topics covered include the Earth-Sun system, the structure and composition of the Earth's atmosphere, global circulation patterns, severe weather, global climate change, physical oceanography, shoreline processes, and the seafloor and plate tectonics. This course may not be taken for credit by students who take GEG 101. 3 hrs. lect.

Planet Earth

ESC 102

This course provides an introduction to minerals and rocks, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanism, the geologic processes by which water, wind and ice slowly sculpt the Earth's landscape and a broad survey of the evolution of planet Earth over its 4.6 billion-year geologic history. An optional field trip may be offered. This course is designed for non-science majors. Students who have previously passed ESC 104, or students presently enrolled in ESC 104 may not take this course.

History of Life

ESC 103

Designed for the non-science major, this course provides an introduction to the over 3.5 billion-year history of life on planet Earth as preserved in the geologic record. This course will examine the origin of life on Earth, how life on Earth has changed dramatically through time by the mechanism of evolution, the influence of plate tectonics and other geologic forces on the evolution of life, how organisms are preserved as fossils in sedimentary rocks, famous fossil localities, and the impact of mass extinction events in the geologic record. This course includes a Saturday field trip. 3 hrs. lect.

Physical Geology

ESC 104

This course is an introduction to physical geology and a study of Earth materials and the physical processes that alter them over time. Topics covered include minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earth resources; plate tectonics; earthquakes; volcanism; weathering and erosion; streams; groundwater; glaciers and the Ice Age; desert landforms; and shoreline processes. In the laboratory, students learn to identify common minerals and rocks, to use topographic and geologic maps, and to recognize structures and landforms in the field. This course includes several local field trips during regular lab time and an all-day Saturday field trip. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Co-requisites: ENG 101 and MAT 105 or higher.

Intro to the Fashion Industry

FAS 101

The course explores the factors influencing fashion and explains the process of design development and apparel production. Included are the global and economic importance of the industry, categories of apparel, retail markets and an understanding of the chain of processes in relationship to the whole of the industry. Fall

Apparel Construction

FAS 110

This introductory course addresses techniques and terminology used in the apparel industry. Students will learn how to use hand and machine sewing techniques, while applying elements of design, fabrication, and basics of flat patternmaking utilized in the completion of several projects. A notebook of techniques will be developed. 1 hr lect. 4 hrs studio.


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