Courses

81 - 100 of 102 courses found when searching for ""

Policing in America

CRJ 214

This course is designed to familiarize students with the history, organization, responsibilities, and challenges of policing in the United States. Policing is explored from multiple perspectives including: An examination of police officer-citizen interaction, the critical relationship between the community and its protectors policing in a free and democratic society, and system relationships with other justice and human service organizations. This course will focus on the examination of issues and strategies that will serve to bridge the gap between the community and the police.

Constit/Criminal Procedures

CRJ 215

An exploration of the constitutional dimensions and limitations on the behavior of participants in the criminal justice system is provided in this course. Students study cases involving the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, and 14th Amendments.

Sci,Legal Aspects,Invest

CRJ 218

Students examine the scientific and legal principles and procedures for locating, gathering, examining, preserving, and presenting forensic evidence at various phases of the criminal process.

Criminal Justice Admin

CRJ 219

This course introduces students to the study and exploration of the entire administrative spectrum of criminal justice including: organizational principles and theory, applications to criminal justice agencies, motivation, productivity, financial and personnel administration, rights of criminal justice employees, technology, discipline and liability issues, community relations, ethics, and effectively dealing with a variety of emergency management issues. An emphasis will be placed on learning from actual public administration case studies and on preparing for new challenges that future criminal justice administrators will likely confront.

Understanding Crime/Crim Behav

CRJ 230

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the scientific study of criminal situations and criminal behavior. The course will cover the importance of measuring crime and review major sources that collect crime information. It will also examine the major criminological theories from biology, economics, psychology, and sociology and focus especially on neo-classical approaches that seek to manipulate environments to reduce and/or prevent criminal behavior. The course will explore historical, political, and empirical trends leading to theory development. Prerequisites: ENG 101, SOC 101, and either CRJ 101, or HUS 103

Contemp Issues-Crim Justice

CRJ 231

This is an overview of some of the current issues, problems, and concerns within the three branches of the criminal justice system. Selected topics may include terrorism, corruption, plea bargaining, organized crime, new modes of treatment in the correctional setting, and sources of violence.

Ethics in Criminal Justice

CRJ 233

This course introduces the fundamentals of ethical theory with an area-specific examination of ethical dilemmas pertaining to the professions of the criminal justice system. Students will focus on comprehensive issues facing law enforcement, legal practice, sentencing, corrections, research, and crime control policy. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101

Criminal Justice Internship

CRJ 255

Under the supervision of criminal justice officials, students participate in agency activities by performing a variety of support services and administrative tasks. Students have an opportunity to contrast criminal justice theory with the reality of the workplace. Appointment to, and continuation in, any internship is contingent upon meeting specific eligibility requirements and the standards of the sponsoring criminal justice agency. In addition, students attend a one-hour lecture each week. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 30 credits with a 2.5 grade-point average and/or by advisement. Phone 687-5192 for further information.

Fundamentals of Computers

CSC 101

Students are introduced to the computer and some of its current uses in this computer literacy course which provides hands-on experience. Students learn to prepare documents, spreadsheets, and database reports during laboratory class time. Students are expected to complete homework assignments outside class in the College's computer laboratory or on home computers. This course does not satisfy any requirements for students in the Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, or Network Administrator programs. The course is taught using Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office. Lab fee.

Web Application Development I

CSC 131

This course explores the web development processes and tools used to support the creation of websites and web applications. Students explore HTML, CSS and JavaScript and use them to create websites and web applications hosted by a web server. Web application development frameworks will also be introduced. Through labs and projects students create both static and dynamic web content in the context of producing a professional quality web site. The course focuses on the underlying tools of web development. Prerequisite: familiarity with text file editing as determined by the instructor.

Computer Science I

CSC 150

This course covers the fundamentals of computer problem solving and programming. Topics includes: program development process, differences between the object-oriented, structured, and functional programming methodologies, phases of language translation (compiling, interpreting, linking, executing), and error conditions associated with each phase, primitive data types, memory representation, variables, expressions, assignment, fundamental programming constructs (sequence, selection, iteration), algorithms for solving simple problems, tracing execution, subprograms/functions/methods, parameter passing, secure coding techniques (criteria for selections of a specific type and use, input data validation), and professional behavior in response to ethical issues inherent in computing. The Java programming language is used. Corequisite: MAT 115 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

Comp Sci III/Data Structures

CSC 201

This course covers the fundamentals of data structures and software modeling. Topics include: modern IDE for software development and code version management systems, design and development of reusable software, software modeling (class diagram, use case, CRC card), introduction to analysis of algorithms (order notation), abstract properties, implementation and use of stacks, queues, linked lists, and binary trees, binary search trees, recursion, and efficiency of recursive solutions, range of search (sequential, binary), select (min,max, median), and sort algorithms (quicksort, merge sort, heap sort) and their time and space efficiencies, software quality assurance (pre and post conditions, program testing), team development of software applications, and professional responsibilities and liabilities associated with software development. Prerequisite: CSC 180 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the instructor.

Android App Development

CSC 210

Android is now the most widely used operating system among smart phones, tablets, and PCs. This course prepares the student to be a professional Android software developer. It is based on an app-driven approach. Mobile system concepts specific to Android are presented in the context of complete working Android apps, rather than using sample code snippets. The student is expected to construct these applications and test them in a simulated mobile device environment. Concepts and techniques introduced in this course include: • Fundamentals of the Android Studio development environment • Concepts and structure of the Android application environment • Graphical user interface conventions and graphical concepts • Remote access to information using industry standard protocols • Access to relational data stored on the Android device (via SQLite or equivalent) • Animation and simple game development Corerequisite: CSC 180 or permission of the instructor.

Computer Game Design II

CSC 225

This course expands on the fundamental computer game concepts and techniques introduced in CSC 220, Computer Game Design I. It advances use of the C# programming language to animate and handle interactions with the game environment, game elements and the players. Special emphasis will be given to insuring good game performance. Physical principles of mechanics and lighting will be enlarged to include more natural movement, interaction among objects such as wind and lighting with shading and textures. Computer programming scripts will interact in advanced ways with objects composed of curves, and coverings such as clothed human actors in the game. Prerequisite: CSC 220 or permission of the instructor.

Comp Architecture & Organ

CSC 250

This course covers fundamentals of computer architecture and organization. Topics include: classical von Neumann machine, major functional units, primary memory, representation of numerical (integer and floating point) and non-numerical data, CPU architecture, instruction encoding, fetch-decode-execute cycle, instruction formats, addressing modes, symbolic assembler, assembly language programming, handling of subprogram calls at assembly level, mapping between high level language patterns and assembly/machine language, interrupts and I/O operations, virtual memory management, and data access from a magnetic disk. Prerequisite: CSC 180 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the instructor.

Intro to Macroeconomics

ECO 101

Students are introduced to national income analysis. Topics include money, banking and monetary policy, national income determination and fiscal policy, macroeconomic policy, the problems of inflation and unemployment, and economic growth. Prerequisite: MAT 100 or high school Mathematics Course II or by advisement.

Intro to Microeconomics

ECO 102

The laws of markets are surveyed in this course. Topics include the law of supply and demand, the economics of the firm, competition, monopoly, and economic regulation. Prerequisite: MAT 100 or high school Mathematics Course II or by advisement.

Appl Child Developmt-Ed Majors

EDU 200

Students apply concepts and theories of child development while participating in a 20-hour field experience in a Kindergarten-Grade 6 classroom. This course must be taken concurrently with a PSY 200 Psychology of Child Development section reserved for Education majors. Prerequisite: Students should have a minimum cumulative average of 2.00, recommendations of two SUNY Ulster instructors, and required fingerprinting. Contact the Education Program Coordinator for fingerprint information.

Soc & Phil Fdn of Education

EDU 203

This course will provide students with a greater understanding of the social and philosophical issues involved in education and an understanding of the historical development of the public education system in the United States.

Appl Adolescent Develop-Ed Maj

EDU 206

Students apply concepts and theories of adolescent development while participating in a 20-hour field experience in grades 7-8 in a middle school setting. This course must be taken concurrently with PSY 206 Psychology of Adolescence. Prerequisite: Students should have a minimum cumulative average of 2.00, recommendations of two SUNY Ulster instructors, and required fingerprinting. Contact the Education Program Coordinator for fingerprint information.


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