Courses

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HUS Practicum&Seminar II

HUS 213

Human Services Field Practicum and Seminar in Generalist Practice II is the second in a two-course sequence designed to offer students the opportunity to apply values, concepts, skills and competencies acquired in the classroom to supervised participation in a human services agency. In addition to studying the structure and function of a Human Service setting and the characteristics and issues of individuals receiving services, students strengthen fundamental generalist practice skills by observing experienced practitioners and interacting with individuals, families, groups and community members at a level appropriate to the placement level and agency setting. Students provide direct service, maintain records, participate in professional supervision, give and receive peer feedback and critically evaluate their own performance as entry-level generalist practitioners providing direct service to clients. Bi-weekly seminars provide students with the opportunity to integrate what they learn in class with what they learn in the field. The requirements of this course include completion of 125 hours in the field placement agency and 15 hours of classroom-based seminar offered on campus in alternate weeks during the semester. Prerequisite: HUS 211 and HUS 212.

HUS Field Experience

HUS 214

Students spend 6-8 hours per week, or ninety hours during the semester, in direct service to a human service agency and weekly meetings with the field instructor. Students develop an individualized learning plan in collaboration with the field instructor and site supervisor that emphasizes the integration of classroom learning with learning in the field and strengthens work related competencies. This course is recommended for Human Service majors in the A.S. degree program who want to expand their knowledge of human services as a profession and/or gain relevant experience in the field in preparation for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 hours of Major Core Courses, HUS 103, ENG 101.

Machining & Production II

IND 142

Advanced functions of a lathe and milling machine, including use of hand and precision tools required for operation, are presented in this course. Materials fee. Prerequisites: IND 130 and IND 141.

Field Experience

IND 293

This field course provides the opportunity for the student to work in a place of business that utilizes any of a number of skills inherent within the drafting and design area of industrial technology. A minimum of 120 hours of fieldwork is required. Prerequisite: Permission of the Industrial Technology and Internship Coordinators.

Information Literacy

LIB 111

Students will learn the concepts and skills required to locate and manage accurate and authoritative information, fulfilling academic, professional, and personal demands. Critical thinking is reinforced through hands-on applications to develop competency and to build an awareness of the broader issues emerging in the digital landscape. Students will practice techniques to adapt to rapidly changing technology, and to become discriminating users of information in multiple formats and subject areas.

Basic Algebra

MAT 098

The following topics are covered in this first course in algebra: signed numbers, properties of real numbers, operations with polynomials, introduction to exponents, first degree equations and inequalities, introduction to absolute value, word problems, and graphing. Students may not use this course to satisfy mathematics requirements or mathematics electives in a program unless specifically approved by the Department of Mathematics and the department offering that program. The course satisfies an open elective at SUNY Ulster, but may not transfer to other institutions. Prerequisite: ISP 091 with a grade of C or better or by Entering Student Assessment.

Intermediate Algebra

MAT 100

Extending the skills covered in MAT 098, students learn factoring, algebraic fractions, exponents, roots, radicals, and quadratic functions. Students may not use this course to satisfy mathematics requirements or mathematics electives in a program unless specifically approved by the Department of Mathematics and the department offering that program. The course satisfies an open elective at SUNY Ulster, but may not transfer to other institutions. Prerequisite: MAT 098 with a grade of C or better or equivalent course in elementary algebra or by Entering Student Assessment.

College Algebra

MAT 105

Topics in this course include complex numbers; linear and quadratic equations; absolute value and polynomial inequalities; coordinate geometry of the line and circle; linear and polynomial functions; techniques of graphing; exponential functions; and an introduction to logarithms. A scientific hand-held calculator is required. Prerequisite: MAT 100 with a grade of C or better, high school equivalent (see Guidelines for Mathematics Placement, p. 178), or by Entering Student Assessment. This course should not be taken by students who plan to take MAT 160.

Coll Algebra&Trigonometry

MAT 115

Topics in mathematics preparatory to MAT 160 are covered in this course. Students study linear and quadratic equations; absolute value and polynomial inequalities; coordinate geometry of the line and circle; linear and polynomial functions; techniques of graphing; exponential functions; logarithms; right triangle trigonometry; trigonometric functions of any angle; and fundamental trigonometric identities. A scientific hand-held calculator is required. Prerequisite: MAT 100 with a grade of C or better, high school equivalent (see Guidelines for Mathematics Placement), or by Entering Student Assessment.

Pre-Calculus

MAT 160

Topics in mathematics preparatory to MAT 170 are covered in this course. Students study functions (polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric), inverse functions, and conic sections. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: MAT 115 with a grade of C or better, high school equivalent (see Guidelines for Mathematics Placement), or by Entering Student Assessment.

Calculus I

MAT 170

Survey of functions; limits; the first and second derivative; definite integrals; differentiation of polynomial, exponential, and trigonometric functions; curve sketching; and other applications of the derivative are covered in this course. This is the first of a three-course sequence dealing with Calculus. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: MAT 160 with a grade of C or better or high school equivalent (see Guidelines for Mathematics Placement).

Calculus II

MAT 180

The antiderivative, techniques of integration, applications of the definite integral, approximations, improper integrals, L'Hospital's Rule, series, and sequences are covered in this course. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: MAT 170 with a grade of C or better.

Elementary Statistics

MAT 211

The following topics are covered in this non calculus based course: the organization of data, central tendency and dispersion, probability, binomial and normal distribution, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, and the Chi-square distribution. A scientific hand-held calculator is required. Prerequisite: MAT 105 or higher (excluding MAT 120, 140 and 240), or high school equivalent.

Applied Music

MUS 128

Private instruction in brass, woodwinds, strings, percussion, piano, guitar, voice, or organ is offered in this course. This study consists of 14 one-hour lessons, plus a final examination and recital participation. Music studio fee.

Internship in Music

MUS 293

Students will be engaged in practical work experience within the field of music. The parameters of the internship will be established between the student and the hosting organization under the department's supervision. A contract specifying hours and a method of evaluation will be signed by the parties with sufficient hours for the credits earned. This opportunity will be open to second-year students, with the approval of the student's academic advisor and the department chairperson. Phone 687-5192 for further information.

Writing II

OTP 081

Students study the fundamentals of writing and work in paragraph development leading to the short essay. A minimum of 10 essays, including three short in-class essays, will be written. At the end of the semester, students must take and pass a writing competency test, which is evaluated by a panel of instructors. Students who pass the test receive the grade earned during the semester; those who do not pass must repeat the course. Prerequisite: Placement by test or completion of OTP 080 with a grade of C or better. A grade of C or better must be earned for advancement to ENG 101.

Princ of Law - Police Officers

PBT 103

An introduction to the law as required of candidates. Topics include jurisdiction and responsibility of law enforcement, criminal and civil adjudicatory process and court structure, constitutional law, penal law, criminal procedure law, juvenile law, civil liability, ancillary NYS statutes and vehicle and traffic law.

Police Procedures

PBT 105

Public Safety procedures introduces candidates to the various topics, skills, actions, and procedures required of a police officer. Topics include observation and patrol procedures, reacting to and dealing with bomb threats, emotionally disturbed persons, crimes in progress, traffic enforcement procedures, arrest procedures, arrest processing and dealing with alcohol intoxication.

Police Procedures - Proficient

PBT 106

This course integrates the academic, basic physical and psychomotor skills required of a candidate. The physical application of this course curriculum complements the academic instruction introduced and established throughout the Police Basic Training program curriculum. Candidates are instructed and become certified as competent in the areas of arrest techniques, defensive tactics, the use of aerosol and impact devices, riot control formations, emergency vehicle operation, unusual occurrences, critical incident management, and the physical training requirements of an entry level police officer.

Comm Relations-Police Officers

PBT 111

This course covers community relations issues and skills for the candidate. Topics include community policing and problem solving, community resources, services to victims and witnesses, crime prevention, crimes against the elderly, ethical awareness issues, cultural diversity, bias related incidents, persons with disabilities, sexual harassment issues and contemporary police problems.


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