Courses

21 - 40 of 51 courses found when searching for ""

Earth's Atmosphere & Oceans

ESC 101

Designed for the non-science major, this course provides an introduction to Earth Science through an examination of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Topics covered include the Earth-Sun system, the structure and composition of the Earth's atmosphere, global circulation patterns, severe weather, global climate change, physical oceanography, shoreline processes, and the seafloor and plate tectonics. This course may not be taken for credit by students who take GEG 101. 3 hrs. lect.

Geology of the National Parks

ESC 114

Designed for the non-science major, this course provides an introduction to geology and the geological evolution of North America through a detailed examination of selected U.S. National Parks and Monuments. National Parks studied include the Grand Canyon, Zion, Canyonlands, Petrified Forest, Badlands, Mammoth Cave, Carlsbad Caverns, Acadia, Yosemite, Mt. Rainier, Crater Lake, Hawaii Volcanoes, Yellowstone, and Death Valley among others. In addition to learning about the geology of North America's National Parks, students will also gain an appreciation for the scenic beauty, natural resources, flora, and fauna preserved in these unique areas. Pre or Corequisite: ENG 102. 3 hrs. lect.

Accel Elem French I & II

FRE 115

An accelerated course for students who have taken high school French, but who need to review elementary French, this course features regular practice with language tapes and videos and extensive practice of communication skills. The course is intended to satisfy two semester language requirements. It meets for six hours each week. Prerequisite: Two years of high school French or by advisement.

Intermediate French I

FRE 201

A third-level course for students who can already communicate orally in simple French and who have a good knowledge of basic French grammar, Intermediate French I stresses improvement in speaking, reading, and writing French. Students read articles from French newspapers and magazines and simplified selections from French literature. In addition, they review French grammar and practice applying it in conversations, reports, and compositions. Recommended: Three to four years of high school French, the equivalent of FRE 102 or FRE 111 or FRE 115, or by advisement.

Western Civilization I

HIS 101

This survey course traces the development of Western Civilization from the ancient world through the end of the 16th century. This course meets the SUNY General Education requirement for European history. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101.

Western Civilization II

HIS 102

This survey course traces the development of Western Civilization from the 17th century to the present. This course meets the SUNY General Education requirement for European history. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101.

American History II

HIS 104

This survey course traces the development of American civilization from the post-Civil War era through the present. This course meets the SUNY General Education requirement for American history. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101.

Information Literacy

LIB 111

Students will learn the concepts and skills required to locate and manage accurate and authoritative information, fulfilling academic, professional, and personal demands. Critical thinking is reinforced through hands-on applications to develop competency and to build an awareness of the broader issues emerging in the digital landscape. Students will practice techniques to adapt to rapidly changing technology, and to become discriminating users of information in multiple formats and subject areas.

Basic Algebra

MAT 098

The following topics are covered in this first course in algebra: signed numbers, properties of real numbers, operations with polynomials, introduction to exponents, first degree equations and inequalities, introduction to absolute value, word problems, and graphing. Students may not use this course to satisfy mathematics requirements or mathematics electives in a program unless specifically approved by the Department of Mathematics and the department offering that program. The course satisfies an open elective at SUNY Ulster, but may not transfer to other institutions. Prerequisite: MAT 091 with a grade of C or better or by Entering Student Assessment.

Intermediate Algebra

MAT 100

Extending the skills covered in MAT 098, students learn factoring, algebraic fractions, exponents, roots, radicals, and quadratic functions. Students may not use this course to satisfy mathematics requirements or mathematics electives in a program unless specifically approved by the Department of Mathematics and the department offering that program. The course satisfies an open elective at SUNY Ulster, but may not transfer to other institutions. Prerequisite: MAT 098 with a grade of C or better or equivalent course in elementary algebra or by Entering Student Assessment.

Coll Algebra&Trigonometry

MAT 115

Topics in mathematics preparatory to MAT 160 are covered in this course. Students study linear and quadratic equations; absolute value and polynomial inequalities; coordinate geometry of the line and circle; linear and polynomial functions; techniques of graphing; exponential functions; logarithms; right triangle trigonometry; trigonometric functions of any angle; and fundamental trigonometric identities. A scientific hand-held calculator is required. Prerequisite: MAT 100 with a grade of C or better, high school equivalent (see Guidelines for Mathematics Placement), or by Entering Student Assessment.

Pre-Calculus

MAT 160

Topics in mathematics preparatory to MAT 170 are covered in this course. Students study functions (polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric), inverse functions, and conic sections. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: MAT 115 with a grade of C or better, high school equivalent (see Guidelines for Mathematics Placement), or by Entering Student Assessment.

Calculus I

MAT 170

Survey of functions; limits; the first and second derivative; definite integrals; differentiation of polynomial, exponential, and trigonometric functions; curve sketching; and other applications of the derivative are covered in this course. This is the first of a three-course sequence dealing with Calculus. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: MAT 160 with a grade of C or better or high school equivalent (see Guidelines for Mathematics Placement).

Calculus II

MAT 180

The antiderivative, techniques of integration, applications of the definite integral, approximations, improper integrals, L'Hospital's Rule, series, and sequences are covered in this course. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: MAT 170 with a grade of C or better.

Elementary Statistics

MAT 211

The following topics are covered in this non calculus based course: the organization of data, central tendency and dispersion, probability, binomial and normal distribution, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, and the Chi-square distribution. A scientific hand-held calculator is required. Prerequisite: College-level General Education mathematics course with a grade of C or better, or high school equivalent.

Phil, Princ & Organ-Coaching

PEC 297

The primary goal of this course is to enhance students' knowledge and understanding of concepts and techniques of coaching and their application to achieving important objectives in working with athletes. The class will help students develop an understanding of coaching philosophy and essential techniques including practice planning, program organization, coaching roles, and instruction. This course will combine sport science theory and research with the practical knowledge and methods of expert coaches.

Health Sci Applied to Coaching

PEC 298

The primary goal of this course is to enhance students' knowledge through a series of interactive activities designed to study Health Sciences as they apply to coaching. Through these activities, participants will gain information that can be applied to their particular program. The course will also help to define: selected principles of biology, anatomy, physiology, kinesiology related to coaching, risk minimization, mixed competition, NYSED selection and classification of athletes, age and maturity of athletes.

Theory & Technique of Coaching

PEC 299

The goal of this course is to discuss and improve our individual coaching beliefs, tactics, organization, and coaching philosophy. The course will touch on methods for developing, training, and conditioning athletes, while primarily focusing on the role of the coach and how to get student athletes to perform up to their expectations.

Introduction to Philosophy

PHI 101

Students examine fundamental philosophical problems and concepts and study various major philosophers and their representative works.

General Psychology

PSY 101

An examination of human behavior, this course covers such topics as learning, memory, problem solving, perception, motivation, personality, intelligence, testing, and abnormal behavior.


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