Courses

21 - 40 of 65 courses found when searching for ""

Ethics in Criminal Justice

CRJ 233

This course introduces the fundamentals of ethical theory with an area-specific examination of ethical dilemmas pertaining to the professions of the criminal justice system. Students will focus on comprehensive issues facing law enforcement, legal practice, sentencing, corrections, research, and crime control policy. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101

Web Application Development II

CSC 132

This course covers advanced web application development frameworks, languages and techniques such as Ruby on Rails, jQuery, AngularJS, PHP,and Node.js or equivalent. Students work in teams to develop real-world web application projects. Topics include an overview of the Model-View-Controller (MVC) software architectural pattern and database fundamentals using MySQL or equivalent. Prerequisite: CSC 131 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the instructor.

Computer Science II

CSC 180

This course covers the fundamentals of algorithms and object oriented software development. Topics include: modern IDE for software development, primitive and reference data types, encapsulation, information hiding, selection, iteration, functions/methods, parameters, recursion, exception handling, generic linear data structures (arrays,records/structs) and maps, file types, file I/O, simple GUIs with event handling, programming to an interface, lambda expressions, semantics of inheritance and use of polymorphism, relation with subtyping, search (sequential, binary), select (min, max), and sort (bubble, insertion, selection) algorithms, complexity notation, documentation using standard tools, program testing (unit testing) and debugging, reasoning about control flow in a program, and societal impacts related to computing and software. Prerequisite: CSC 150 with a C- or better or permission of the instructor.

Apple iOS App Development

CSC 215

This course prepares the student to be a mobile application developer for Apple iOS devices such as the iPhone and iPad using Swift, a new programming language from Apple. Concepts and techniques introduced in this course include: · Introduction to the Apple Xcode application environment · The Swift Programming Language · Differences between iPhone and iPad Development · Animation and simple game development · Apple guidelines for publishing apps on the Apple App Store. Corerequisite: CSC 180 or permission of the instructor.

Computer Game Design I

CSC 220

This course is an introduction to the principles of computer game development. As such, it draws on the student's background in math and physics and enables a creative expression in addition to building on computer science concepts of object oriented programming. It covers the main concepts, principles, and techniques for designing playable computer games. Students will study and learn to utilize a variety of technologies relevant to games including tools and frameworks for game development; languages to manipulate game elements, 3 dimensional modeling, the physical principles of game object behavior, principles of scene lighting and sound effects. Computer simulation is the fundamental technology underlying all of thesre principles. Basic game theory and concepts will be studied and used in the projects developed during the course. Corequisite: CSC 180 or permission of the instructor.

Comp Architecture & Organ

CSC 250

This course covers fundamentals of computer architecture and organization. Topics include: classical von Neumann machine, major functional units, primary memory, representation of numerical (integer and floating point) and non-numerical data, CPU architecture, instruction encoding, fetch-decode-execute cycle, instruction formats, addressing modes, symbolic assembler, assembly language programming, handling of subprogram calls at assembly level, mapping between high level language patterns and assembly/machine language, interrupts and I/O operations, virtual memory management, and data access from a magnetic disk. Prerequisite: CSC 180 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the instructor.

Theory/Prac ObjectOriented Pro

CSC 260

The object-oriented programming paradigm is presented in this course. Students implement data abstraction using classes and inheritance, creating reusable objects that are the basis for object-oriented programs. Polymorphism is implemented using virtual functions. Topics include inline functions, function and operator overloading, base and derived classes, multiple inheritance, and storage management in constructors and destructors. Prerequisite: CSC 150 and CSC 201, or equivalent computer experience by advisement.

Special Topics in Computer Sci

CSC 270

This course explores special topics in the field of computing through a more concentrated study in a current applied or theoretical area of the field. Each course emphasizes a basic understanding of the topics' content, and an introduction to its underlying mathematical and other foundations. The course explores topics of interest outside of the scope of current computing courses and requires a significant project and/or research paper in the subject area as a major component of the final grade. Prerequisite:CSC 150 or permission of the instructor or coordinator.

Intro to Macroeconomics

ECO 101

Students are introduced to national income analysis. Topics include money, banking and monetary policy, national income determination and fiscal policy, macroeconomic policy, the problems of inflation and unemployment, and economic growth. Prerequisite: MAT 100 or high school Mathematics Course II or by advisement.

Intro to Microeconomics

ECO 102

The laws of markets are surveyed in this course. Topics include the law of supply and demand, the economics of the firm, competition, monopoly, and economic regulation. Prerequisite: MAT 100 or high school Mathematics Course II or by advisement.

College English I

ENG 101

Students read, discuss, and write essays that explore contemporary social issues. Students work on skills necessary to meet the challenge of writing accurately and clearly on the college level. Students write a minimum of eight essays, including three in-class essays. Emphasis is on the development of a topic, use of appropriate rhetoric and research, and a review of grammar. At the end of the semester, students must take and pass a writing competency test, which is evaluated by a panel of instructors. Students who pass the test receive the grade earned during the semester; those who do not pass must repeat the course. Prerequisite: Placement by Entering Student Assessment or completion of ENG 081 with a grade of C or better. A grade of C or better must be earned for advancement to ENG 102.

College English II

ENG 102

Students read and discuss literature that explores the human condition and its moral dilemmas, social problems, and values. This course continues to stress the development of writing skills, with emphasis on criticism, analysis, research methods, and documentation. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 101 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite or corequisite: LIB 111.

Technical Writing

ENG 227

An introduction to technical writing, this course considers the problems of presenting technical subject matter and provides instruction and practice in report writing and oral presentations. Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a C or better or A.A.S. program requirement or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite or corequisite: LIB 111.

Earth's Atmosphere & Oceans

ESC 101

Designed for the non-science major, this course provides an introduction to Earth Science through an examination of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Topics covered include the Earth-Sun system, the structure and composition of the Earth's atmosphere, global circulation patterns, severe weather, global climate change, physical oceanography, shoreline processes, and the seafloor and plate tectonics. This course may not be taken for credit by students who take GEG 101. 3 hrs. lect.

First Year Experience

FYE 101

This course exposes students to various skills, techniques and strategies that have been identified as high impact practices most likely to positively impact college success. These skills include knowledge and tips on college transition, planning, note-taking, studying, time management, technology, awareness as self-learners and other academic skills as well as thorough gaining an awareness of campus resources available to support student success. This course is also designed to integrate foundational SUNY Ulster Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILO's) into each new student's learning experience. This one-credit course is required for all first time college students matriculated in a degree program, including Early College students, former Collegian students now attending the College and students with no prior college experience. Students who matriculate prior to accumulating 12 credits will be required to take this course the semester of matriculation. Students who are currently enrolled in or have completed KEY 103 or COS 101 have met the requirement for FYE 101.

Western Civilization I

HIS 101

This survey course traces the development of Western Civilization from the ancient world through the end of the 16th century. This course meets the SUNY General Education requirement for European history. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101.

Western Civilization II

HIS 102

This survey course traces the development of Western Civilization from the 17th century to the present. This course meets the SUNY General Education requirement for European history. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101.

American History I

HIS 103

This survey course traces the development of American civilization from the colonial era through Reconstruction. This course meets the SUNY General Education requirement for American history. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101.

American History II

HIS 104

This survey course traces the development of American civilization from the post-Civil War era through the present. This course meets the SUNY General Education requirement for American history. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101.

Information Literacy

LIB 111

Students will learn the concepts and skills required to locate and manage accurate and authoritative information, fulfilling academic, professional, and personal demands. Critical thinking is reinforced through hands-on applications to develop competency and to build an awareness of the broader issues emerging in the digital landscape. Students will practice techniques to adapt to rapidly changing technology, and to become discriminating users of information in multiple formats and subject areas.


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