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Prin of Accounting I

ACC 101

Students are introduced to basic principles and concepts of accounting in this course. Topics include the accounting cycle, accruals and deferrals, preparation of financial statements, internal control, and an in-depth study of current assets.

Financial Accounting

ACC 200

Students are introduced to basic concepts of financial accounting and reporting in this course. Students study the environment of accounting, the accounting model and the use of financial statements for business decision making. Key topics include accruals and deferrals, current assets, long-term assets and debt, and corporate equity. Prerequisites: MAT 105 or higher.

Intro to Visual Arts I

ART 101

A basic introduction to concepts and philosophical theories underlying the organization of art forms is provided in this course. Through the study of line, form, space, value, color, and texture, as interpreted in both historical and contemporary contexts, the course stresses an understanding of the elements and principles of design in the visual arts. Pre or Corequisite: ENG 101

Art History I

ART 107

This course presents a beginning survey of art history in western civilizations and other global civilizations, from antiquity through the Middle Ages. Students are provided with the opportunity to evaluate various art forms as influenced by traditional, cultural, social and religious conditions, technological progress, and industrial civilization. Pre or Corequisite: ENG 101

Fund Concepts of Biology

BIO 100

Designed for students who plan to study biology, nursing, or veterinary technology courses. This non-laboratory course covers topics from the basic principles of life through the cell concept. The course strengthens the student's in biology. Topics covered include cell reproduction, cell respiration, and classification. Students may not use this course to satisfy a science requirement or science elective.

Biology I-Non-Science Majors

BIO 101

Designed for the non-science major, this nonlaboratory course covers basic concepts such as the cell, principles of inheritance, and the species. Students study cell structure and function, DNA, cell division, and the kingdoms.

Human Biology

BIO 109

This is a non-laboratory biology course designed for the non-science major who has an interest in learning about the human body. Students will study the basic anatomy and physiology of major body systems and some common diseases associated with those systems. Special emphasis will be placed on topics of modern concern such as new diseases and new techniques for treating the human body. Students will be encouraged to learn to use information in this class for making informed personal and societal decisions.

Medical Terminology

BIO 111

This course presents a study of basic medical terminology. The primary purpose is for students to be able to analyze a word and determine its meaning and proper usage. The correct spelling of terms is also emphasized.


BIO 201

The study of microorganisms both beneficial and harmful to humans is covered in this course. Students learn taxonomy, structure, physiology, reproduction, ecology, and control of microbes. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: One year of laboratory biology courses.

Math for Bus & Industry

BUS 102

Students apply basic mathematics to situations encountered in business and industry. Emphasis is placed on solving word problems from a variety of topical areas including resource management, wholesale and retail pricing, payroll and accounting-related tasks, and simple and compound interest related applications.


BUS 115

Students are introduced to the basics required for starting and operating a small business. Subjects include marketing, financing, legal structures, franchising, and managing employees. Students will apply terminology and concepts in developing a draft business plan.

Principles of Management

BUS 161

The basics of operational theory and the science of management are presented. Concepts center on an analysis of the four major functions of management: planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. The course emphasizes the integration of management principles with other business procedures and examines management interactions with external environments influencing business.

Computer Appli In Bus

BUS 171

Using the Microsoft Office<sup>&reg;</sup> suite of business applications for the PC, students learn how computers can aid the business decision-making process. The course introduces appropriate terminology and concepts using hands-on training. Applications include word processing, spreadsheets, database management, and presentation software. The course only supports the use of Windows based Microsoft Office<sup>&reg;</sup>. Lab fee.

Legal Environment of Business

BUS 180

Students study the fundamental concepts, principles and rules of law and equity that apply to business activities. Legal theory is applied to commercial transactions. Topics covered include an introduction to the law and the legal system, the Uniform Commercial Code, contracts, sale of good, negotiable instruments, product liability, negligence, agency, bailment, torts, and employment law. This course is required for students in the Business and Entrepreneurship and Business: Accounting A.A.S. degree programs. It is not recommended for students enrolled in the transfer-oriented A.S. in Business Administration program.

Business Law I

BUS 201

This course provides an analysis of business transactions in the legal environment. Topics include an introduction to the history of modern commercial law, the courts, and the legal processes; detailed examination of the principles of the laws of contracts, including contracts for the international sale of goods (CISG); and consideration of related topics including product liability and business torts. Pre-requisite: ENG 101.

Business Law II

BUS 202

This is a comprehensive analysis of the principles of the laws of commercial paper, agency, partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and other forms of business ownership. Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Advanced Entrepreneurship

BUS 230

This course builds on BUS 115, Entrepreneurship and provides students with a toolkit of strategies, knowledge and resources to empower them with the 21st century skills needed to start and operate sustainable businesses. Students will work in groups to experience the fundamentals of business models/customer development and business planning utilizing the Business Canvas Model. A deeper discussion of the basics of entrepreneurship covered in BUS 115 will include topics such as recognizing business opportunity and developing successful business ideas; assessing and obtaining financing; building a new venture team; marketing issues, challenges and planning; as well as managing and growing the entrepreneurial firm. Today's important business issues including conscious capitalism; stakeholder theory; leadership; social responsibility of business; sustainability; value chain responsibility and diversity in the workplace will be interwoven into the classwork done on entrepreneurship. Prerequisite: BUS 115.

Spreadsheets for Business

BUS 272

Students learn to recognize different classes of business problems that can be solved through the use of spreadsheets. Students learn how to design and develop a spreadsheet from a set of business requirements, apply financial functions, summarize data through the use of pivot tables, extract data from lookup tables, apply conditional logic to make decisions, and consolidate data from different spreadsheets. Lab fee. Prerequisite: BUS 171.

Organic Chemistry I

CHE 201

The nomenclature, properties, preparation, reaction mechanisms, and stereochemistry of the following classes of compounds are studied in this course: aliphatic hydrocarbons containing single, double, and triple bonds; alkyl halides; alcohols and ethers; and carbonyl compounds. 3 hrs. lect. Prerequisite: CHE 104

Organic Chemistry II

CHE 202

The nomenclature, properties, preparation, and reaction mechanisms of all the major functional group families of organic compounds, both aliphatic and aromatic, and the synthetic strategies for the formation and transformation of functional groups are topics in this course. 3 hrs. lect. Prerequisite: CHE 201. Spring

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