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Fund of Acct for Entrepreneurs

ACC 100

Students are introduced to the basic principles of accounting appropriate for the needs of the entrepreneur. Topics covered include the accounting equation, the accounting cycle, financial statements, sales tax, bank reconciliation, and payroll procedures. This course cannot be substituted for ACC 101.

Prin of Accounting II

ACC 102

Students continue to develop an understanding of accounting principles and concepts, in this course which provides for the study of forms of business equity, plant and long-term assets, current and long-term liabilities and cash flow analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 101 with a grade of C or better.

Financial Accounting

ACC 200

Students are introduced to basic concepts of financial accounting and reporting in this course. Students study the environment of accounting, the accounting model and the use of financial statements for business decision making. Key topics include accruals and deferrals, current assets, long-term assets and debt, and corporate equity. Prerequisites: MAT 115 or higher.

Managerial Accounting

ACC 204

Students will study fundamental accounting concepts that are useful to management in planning and controlling its operation. Topics include the measurement of cost, costing systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, cost allocation, budgeting, capital investing, and performance evaluation. Prerequisites: ACC 102 or ACC 200 with a grade of C or better, MAT 100 or higher.

Intro to Visual Arts I

ART 101

A basic introduction to concepts and philosophical theories underlying the organization of art forms is provided in this course. Through the study of line, form, space, value, color, and texture, as interpreted in both historical and contemporary contexts, the course stresses an understanding of the elements and principles of design in the visual arts. Pre or Corequisite: ENG 101

Art History II

ART 108

This course presents a survey of art history in western civilizations and other global civilizations, from the Proto-Renaissance through the Rococo and the 19th century. Students are provided with the opportunity to evaluate various art forms as influenced by traditional, cultural, social and religious conditions, technological progress, and industrial civilization. Pre or Corequisite: ENG 101

History of 20th Century Design

ART 220

This course will introduce the student to artists, engineers, designers, manufacturers, and consumers to establish a definition of design history in the 20th century The course will show the connections of the above mentioned via a broad interdisciplinary view of the economic, social, and esthetic values that determine a meaning for design throughout the century and how it may apply to the present. The course will cover numerous disciplines that include advertising, architecture, fashion, graphic design, industrial design, and performing and visual arts. An emphasis will be placed on the graphic arts and the consumer. Prerequisites: ART 107 & 108 or ART 109 & 110.

Ancient Astronomy

AST 105

This online course will examine the earliest origins of astronomy. The first half of the course will introduce students to the movements of the Earth and other solar system objects; the phases and cycles of the Moon; the origin of seasons, solstices, equinoxes, and eclipses; constellations and celestial navigation; and how ancient civilizations developed our earliest calendars. The second half of the course will be a broad survey of the historical development of astronomy from ancient times up to the scientific revolution of the Renaissance Period. Cosmologies from representative cultures around the world will be examined along with significant archaeoastronomy sites including the Egyptian pyramids, Nabta, Stonehenge, Newgrange, Chichén Itza, Machu Picchu, Chaco Canyon, the Big Horn Medicine Wheel, and others. Corequisites: ENG 101 and MAT 105 or higher. 3 hrs. lect.

Fund Concepts of Biology

BIO 100

Designed for students who plan to study biology or nursing, this nonlaboratory course covers topics from the basic principles of life through the cell concept. The course strengthens the student's background in biology. Topics covered include cell reproduction, cell respiration, photosynthesis, and classification. Students may not use this course to satisfy a science requirement or science elective.

Biology I-Non-Science Majors

BIO 101

Designed for the non-science major, this nonlaboratory course covers basic concepts such as the cell, principles of inheritance, and the species. Students study cell structure and function, DNA, cell division, and the kingdoms. Students may elect to take BIO 121 in conjunction with this course to complete 4 credits of science with a laboratory.