Courses

1 - 20 of 69 courses found when searching for ""

Financial Accounting

ACC 200

Students are introduced to basic concepts of financial accounting and reporting in this course. Students study the environment of accounting, the accounting model and the use of financial statements for business decision making. Key topics include accruals and deferrals, current assets, long-term assets and debt, and corporate equity. Pre or Co-requisites: MAT 115 or higher.

Managerial Accounting

ACC 204

Students will study fundamental accounting concepts that are useful to management in planning and controlling its operation. Topics include the measurement of cost, costing systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, cost allocation, budgeting, capital investing, and performance evaluation. Prerequisites: ACC 102 or ACC 200 with a grade of C or better.

Computerized ACT w/ QuickBooks

ACT 210

Students are introduced to the QuickBooks computerized accounting systems for service and merchandising businesses. In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and practices, students utilize QuickBooks commercial accounting software to prepare and maintain comprehensive accounting information. Prerequisite: ACC 100, 101 or ACC 200 with a grade of C- or better.

Intro to Visual Arts I

ART 101

A basic introduction to concepts and philosophical theories underlying the organization of art forms is provided in this course. Through the study of line, form, space, value, color, and texture, as interpreted in both historical and contemporary contexts, the course stresses an understanding of the elements and principles of design in the visual arts. Pre or Corequisite: ENG 101

Painting I

ART 105

An introduction to painting concepts, this course stresses the relationship of composition and color through perceptual experiences in drawing and painting.

Art History I

ART 107

This course presents a beginning survey of art history in western civilizations and other global civilizations, from antiquity through the Middle Ages. Students are provided with the opportunity to evaluate various art forms as influenced by traditional, cultural, social and religious conditions, technological progress, and industrial civilization. Pre or Corequisite: ENG 101

Fund Concepts of Biology

BIO 100

Designed for students who plan to study biology, nursing, or veterinary technology courses. This non-laboratory course covers topics from the basic principles of life through the cell concept. The course strengthens the student's in biology. Topics covered include cell reproduction, cell respiration, and classification. Students may not use this course to satisfy a science requirement or science elective.

Biology I-Non-Science Majors

BIO 101

Designed for the non-science major, this nonlaboratory course covers basic concepts such as the cell, principles of inheritance, and the species. Students study cell structure and function, DNA, cell division, and the kingdoms.

Human Anat & Physiology II

BIO 108

A continuation of BIO 107, this course covers the normal structure and function of selected organ systems. Laboratory work emphasizes human anatomy utilizing models, specimens, and cat dissections. Students enrolling in BIO 108 who are pregnant or breast-feeding should consult their advisors. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: BIO 107. Prerequisite or corequisite ENG 101.

Human Biology

BIO 109

This is a non-laboratory biology course designed for the non-science major who has an interest in learning about the human body. Students will study the basic anatomy and physiology of major body systems and some common diseases associated with those systems. Special emphasis will be placed on topics of modern concern such as new diseases and new techniques for treating the human body. Students will be encouraged to learn to use information in this class for making informed personal and societal decisions.

Microbiology

BIO 201

The study of microorganisms both beneficial and harmful to humans is covered in this course. Students learn taxonomy, structure, physiology, reproduction, ecology, and control of microbes. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: One year of laboratory biology courses.

Genetics

BIO 206

Aspects of classical and modern genetics are presented in this course. Discussion starts with the structure and function of DNA and moves through the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels of inheritance. In the laboratory, microbial, plant, and animal genetics are investigated using modern techniques of DNA analysis as well as real and virtual techniques of classical genetics. 3 hrs. lect.; 3 hrs. lab. Lab fee. Prerequisite: BIO 105 and BIO 106 or BIO 107 and BIO 108.

Computer Appli In Bus

BUS 171

Using the Microsoft Office suite of business applications for the PC, students learn how computers can aid the business decision-making process. The course introduces appropriate terminology and concepts using hands-on training. Applications include word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software. The course only supports the use of Windows based Microsoft Office. Lab fee.

Market Princ & Practices

BUS 205

A study of the marketing field emphasizing the integrated managerial approach to marketing management is provided. The course features the marketing mix, channel management, consumer/industrial buying behavior, and marketing information systems. The case-study method and problem-solving exercises feature marketing costs, segmentation, decisions, and management methodology. Pre or Co requisite: BUS 161 or BUS 115.

Business Ethics

BUS 249

Business organizations are unique and powerful social entities whose conduct has enormous influence on the direction and results of our society. Therefore the values and particularly the ethical foundations of the business world hold utmost importance on our society's function. This course will explore the importance of business ethics and its relevance to the current corporate environment. Topics will include social responsibility, ethical decision-making, moral philosophies, ethical culture, and developing and implementing effective ethics programs. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and LIB 111.

Business Internship

BUS 293

Students gain practical experience in the field of business through this internship. It is intended to complement and enhance traditional learning concepts used in classroom instruction. Internship assignments will be under the guidance of the Office of Fieldwork and Internships, 687-5192. Enrollment in this course is by student request and by advisement of the Business Department chairperson. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 12 credit hours with a minimum grade-point average of 2.00.

Oral Communication

COM 103

Students practice critical listening, a variety of public speaking situations, language usage, and interpersonal skills. Emphasis is placed on confidence building through research, extemporaneous delivery, and audiovisual reinforcement. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101.

Public Speaking

COM 105

Students gain practical experience in speaking situations, group discussion, and informative and persuasive presentations. Emphasis is on confidence-building through extemporaneous delivery and through audiovisual resources. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENG 101.

Communications Internship

COM 293

Students will be engaged in practical work experience within the areas of Communications and Media Arts. The parameters of the internship will be established between the student and the hosting organization under the department's supervision. A contract specifying hours and a method of evaluation will be signed by the parties with sufficient hours for the credits earned. This opportunity will be open to second-year students, with the approval of the student's academic advisor and the department chairperson.

Juvenile Justice System

CRJ 235

This course presents an examination of prevailing juvenile justice philosophy, existing juvenile justice laws, public policy, and current research and theories, as well as methods of treatment, control, and prevention.


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